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Blog - Exploring climate data (part 2) (changes)

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This is a blog article in progress, written by Blake Pollard. To see discussions of the article as it is being written, visit the Azimuth Forum.

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guest post by Blake Pollard

I have been learning to make animations using R. Here This is an animation of the profile of the surface air temperature at the equator. So, the x axis here is the longitude, approximately from 120° E to 280° E. I pulled the data from the region that Graham Jones specified in his code on github: it’s the region that Ludescherx axis here is the longitude, approximately from 120° E to 280° E. I pulled the data from the region that Graham Jones specified in his code on github: it’s the region that Ludescher et al. used:

For this animation I tried to show the 1997-1998 El Niño. Typically the Pacific is much cooler near South America, due to the upwelling of deep cold water:

(Click for more information.) But This it part warms of up the Pacific gets even cooler during El La Niños: Niña:

But it warms up during El Niños:

You can see that in the surface air temperature in my animation during 1997-1998, the 1997-1998 El Niño, although by summer of 1998 things seem to be getting back to normal:

I want to practice making animations like this. I could make a much prettier and better-labelled animation that ran all the way from 1948 to today, but I wanted to think a little about what exactly is best to plot if we want to use it as an aid to understanding some of this El Niño business.

category: blog, climate